Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Your Right to Opt-Out of Sale of Your Personal Information

If you are a California resident, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) gives you the right to opt-out of the sale of personal information about you or your household — such as, though not limited to, your name, postal or email address, IP address, and/or other personally identifying information — by a business. Once you’ve opted-out of the sale of your personal information by a business, the business is prohibited from selling personal information about you without your express authorization (and must wait at least 12 months before asking you for such authorization).

The right to opt-out is subject to a number of exemptions and exceptions. For example, it generally doesn’t apply to information shared with service providers (as the law and its associated regulations define that term) that process the information for certain business purposes, or to information that has been appropriately deidentified or aggregated.

Although we believe we do not meet any of the applicability thresholds specified by this California law, we are committed to providing visitors with as many privacy choices as we reasonably can.

The laws of certain other U.S. states (e.g., Nevada — see the “Nevada Consumer Opt-Out Rights” section of the Privacy Policy) may provide residents of those states with similar rights with respect to the sale of their personal information. However, other states’ laws may differ significantly from California law in the types of information to which such opt-out rights apply, in what is considered a “sale” of personal information subject to such rights, and in the exemptions and restrictions that may apply. Requests to exercise your rights under the privacy and/or data protection laws of a U.S. state OTHER than California, or of a country outside the U.S., should be submitted via any of the methods described in the “Controllers/Responsible Parties, Questions, and How to Reach Us” section of the Privacy Policy.

How to Opt-Out or Exercise Your Other California Privacy Rights

If you are a California resident and would like to opt-out of the sale of your personal information, and/or to exercise any of the other privacy rights provided by California law — e.g., to request to know about personal information collected, disclosed or sold, and/or request deletion of your personal information — you or your authorized agent can submit a request via the California Privacy Request Form or any of the other methods specified below. Once we have reviewed your submission, we will contact you to discuss the next steps involved in processing your request, which may require us to verify your identity — see the “Identity Verification Requirements” section toward the bottom of this page.

The law and/or its associated regulations specify the maximum time allowed for acknowledging and responding to each type of request. There is no charge for for making a request.

Except as otherwise required by law, requests pertaining to children under 18 should be submitted by a parent, legal guardian, or other authorized adult representative.

California Privacy Request Form

 

Anti-Spam Test

If you cannot or prefer not to use the above California Privacy Request Form, you or your authorized agent can also submit a request via email to admin (at) ateupwithmotor (dot) com or via postal mail to the following address:

Aaron Severson
Attn: Ate Up With Motor Privacy Requests
11100 National Bl. #3
Los Angeles, CA 90064
USA

Requests submitted via email or postal mail should specify:

  1. Who you are, and:
  2. The nature of your request (e.g., to request to know what personal information we’ve collected about you, request to delete your personal information, and/or request to opt-out of the sale of your personal information), and:
  3. Whether your request:
    1. Pertains to your own personal information, or,
    2. Pertains to the personal information of your household (in which case all members of the household may need to make the request jointly), or,
    3. Is on behalf of someone else (in which case you’ll also need to provide proof that that person has authorized you to act on their behalf, or that you have the right to do so for some other reason, e.g., if you are a parent or legal guardian acting on behalf of your minor child), and:
  4. Whether you are a California resident, and:
  5. The best way(s) to contact you so that we can respond to your request and take any steps that may be required to verify your identity (see the “Identity Verification Requirements” section below).

Again, except as otherwise required by law, requests pertaining to children under 18 should be submitted by a parent, legal guardian, or other authorized adult representative.

Please keep in mind that, as with the right to opt-out, the other privacy rights provided by California law are subject to certain exemptions, exceptions, and restrictions provided by the law and/or its associated regulations.

For more information about these rights, or to review our CCPA Information Collection and Sharing Notice (which describes the categories of personal information we may collect, the categories of sources from which such personal information may be collected, our purposes for collecting personal information, and how and why we may share personal information) and other disclosures, see the Your California Privacy Rights page or the “Your California Privacy Rights” section of the Privacy Policy.

The CCPA and its associated regulations impose strict limits on the use and/or disclosure of information related to privacy requests. However, we may share information related to such requests to the extent permitted — and/or required — by applicable law and/or regulations for compliance purposes; to fulfill legal obligations (e.g., to respond to a subpoena or other court order); and/or to publish aggregate information about requests we receive, as described in the “Reports and Aggregate Statistics” section of the Privacy Policy (e.g., statistics on the total number of requests of each type we received during a given calendar year).

(To learn more about what kinds of personal information we may collect through and/or in connection with Ate Up With Motor and/or its associated services and how we may use and/or disclose that information, please consult the Privacy Policy.)

Identity Verification Requirements

Please note that we may be required to verify your identity before processing certain requests pertaining to your personal information. We may be unable to fulfill your request if we cannot verify your identity to the degree of certainty required by applicable law and/or regulations.

The identity verification process typically involves checking information you provide to us against information we already possess. This begins with our checking the information we receive when you submit your request (including both the information you provide and any information we collect automatically in connection with the request). We may also need to ask you some additional questions and/or request additional information in order to verify your identity and/or process your request. In some cases, we may ask you to sign and return a declaration form.

Additionally:

  • If your request is on behalf of another person, we may require (to the extent permitted — and/or required — by applicable law and/or regulations) that you provide proof that that person gave you signed permission to submit the request, and/or require that person to either verify their own identity directly with us or directly confirm with us that they authorized you to submit the request on their behalf.
  • If the request pertains to the personal information of a household rather than a single individual, we may be required to verify the identities of all household members to whose personal information the request pertains.

For a request to know or a request to delete, the current CCPA regulations require us to verify the requestor’s identity to either “a reasonable degree of certainty” (which may include matching at least two data points we have determined to be reliable for verification purposes) or “a reasonably high degree of certainty” (which may include matching at least three pieces of personal information we have determined to be reliable for verification purposes “together with a signed declaration under penalty of perjury that the requestor is the consumer whose personal information is the subject of the request”), depending on the type of request; the type, sensitivity, and value of the personal information involved; and the risk of harm to the consumer posed by unauthorized access or deletion.

If we ask for additional personal information we did not already posses in order to verify the requestor’s identity, the regulations prohibit us from using that additional personal information for any purpose other than verifying the requestor’s identity, security, or fraud prevention. After processing the request, we are only permitted to retain such additional personal information to the extent necessary to comply with the CCPA regulations’ record-keeping requirements.

Even if we verify the requestor’s identity to “a reasonably high degree of certainty,” the regulations prohibit us from disclosing certain pieces of sensitive personal information in response to a request to know. For example, if we possessed your Social Security number, we could not provide you with the actual number we possessed, only the fact that we possessed that information.

Requests by California consumers to opt-out of the sale of their personal information do not require these verification steps, although the current CCPA regulations permit us to deny a request to opt-out if we have “a good-faith, reasonable, and documented belief” that it is fraudulent. (If we deny a request to opt-out on this basis, the regulations require us to inform the requestor and explain why we believe the request is fraudulent.) The regulations also permit us to deny a request to opt-out submitted by an authorized agent on behalf of a consumer if the authorized agent cannot demonstrate that they have signed permission from the consumer authorizing them to act on the consumer’s behalf.

Updated: May 14, 2022 — 9:50 pm