Secrets of the Simpson Gearset

If you’re familiar with transmissions like the Chrysler TorqueFlite and GM Turbo Hydra-Matic (among others), you may have heard of the “Simpson gearset.” In this installment of Ate Up With Motor, we look at the origins and function of the Simpson gearset and briefly introduce you to its inventor, the late Howard W. Simpson.
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Giving Slip the Slip: Lockup Torque Converters and Split Torque Automatic Transmissions

Fluid clutches — fluid couplings and torque converters — have many advantages for automotive transmissions, but with those benefits comes a cost: fuel-wasting hydraulic slippage even at cruising speed. Since the 1940s, automakers have come up with a variety of strategies for reducing or eliminating that slip, including series parallel “split torque” transmissions and different types of converter lockup clutches. In this installment of Ate Up With Motor, we take a look at how GM, Ford, Chrysler, Packard, and Studebaker have approached this slippery problem from 1949 through the late eighties.
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Update Your Bookmarks

As you might have noticed, I have implemented an SSL (secure socket layer) certificate on the site, so the address bar in your browser should now say https rather than http — hopefully without any little yellow triangles or other warning indicators.

I decided to go to HTTPS for four reasons: 1) Search engines are beginning to favor secure sites over ones that are unencrypted; 2) it’s better for security; 3) it’s better for your privacy; and 4) it’s better for my privacy.

The caveat is that setting up HTTPS is complicated even if you are a computer nerd, which I most assuredly am not. It appears things are now working properly and non-secure (http) links are automatically redirecting to secure ones (https), as they should be, but there may be other hiccups I haven’t yet noticed. If you experience any problems, such as your browser warning you that parts of the page are not secure (what’s called a “mixed content” error), please let me know (and be sure to specify what browser you’re using!).

In the meantime, if you have bookmarks to Ate Up With Motor or to specific pages or articles, I would recommend that you update them to the new https addresses at your convenience. Again, the old links should still redirect, but going directly to the secure versions will help the site run faster and encourage search engines to get on the same page.

CarStories Podcast

Recently, I went over to the Petersen Automotive Museum to record a podcast with the CarStories crew and take a tour of the Petersen vault. You can now hear the podcast at the CarStories website or via iTunes.

The website I mentioned in the podcast (which was an inspiration for Ate Up With Motor as regards format and approach) is Greg Goebel’s excellent Vectors. It doesn’t deal with automotive topics, but he’s covered a wide range of other technologies, including many aircraft, spacecraft, and a lot more. I highly recommend it, although be forewarned: If you’re on deadline, get your work done before you get sucked into the site!

Celestial Pony: Toyota’s First-Generation Celica

The first-generation Toyota Celica is one of those cars that used to be everywhere, only to fade into an undeserved obscurity. Often ignored or dismissed by English-language automotive histories, the original Celica was a popular and significant automobile with many interesting permutations, only a few of which ever made it to America and other export markets. In this installment of Ate Up With Motor, we take a look at the complicated saga of the original A20/A30 Celica, Japan’s first “pony car.”

1974 Toyota Celica hardtop (RA21) fender badge © 2011 dave_7 (with permission)
(Photo: “1974 Toyota Celica badge” © 2011 dave_7; used with permission)
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New Article Possibility

I’ve been working on two additional articles. One is another, shorter technical piece as a followup to the previous articles. The other leading possibility is the first-generation (1971–1977 A20/A35) Toyota Celica.

To that end, I will need to gather more photos of the Celica as well as its cousin, the A10/A15/A30 Toyota Carina, the rival Mitsubishi Colt GTO and first-generation Nissan Silvia (a.k.a. Datsun 200SX), and ideally one or two of the early Mazda Savanna (RX-3) coupe.

If you’d like to help with pictures, please let me know via the Contact Form. Thanks!

Hydra-Matic, Dynaflow, Powerglide, and New Content! (Well, sort of.)

As you probably all know, I’ve been working for months on an extensive revamp of the second part of my 2010 article on GM’s early automatics, covering Dynaflow, Powerglide, their successors (including Twin Turbine Dynaflow, Turboglide, and Dual-Path Turbine Drive), and the later generations of Hydra-Matic. That revamp is now done.

The article has been almost completely rewritten, adding a lot of new information (more than doubling its length in the process) and incorporating a lot of corrections. Unlike the previous version, I’ve made a concerted effort to explain the mechanics of each of the 14 transmissions discussed.

This is the newly revised piece, covering Dynaflow, the early Powerglide, Controlled Coupling Hydra-Matic, Roto Hydra-Matic, Turboglide, and others. If you somehow missed the revamped Part 1, this is the history of the first-generation Hydra-Matic.

Yet another…

At the risk of further trying everyone’s patience while waiting for new content, I am pained to announce yet further tinkering with the Privacy Policy to better reflect the current range of embedded content. The reason I keep making these announcements is that the policy as written called for me to announce “material” changes (not counting my fussing with minor details like fixing typographical mistakes). To reduce the amount of policy-related posts, I have added a new Policy Update Minder to the right sidebar, which will show the effective dates of the current versions of the policies so you can review any changes at your convenience. I will now do this instead of taking up a lot of real estate with posts about it (although I may still announce something that constitutes a really big change).

For various reasons, there has been a dearth of new content in recent months, although I spent a while making a lot of housekeeping changes to older articles, fixing factual errors, and the like, and I am still working on the update of the Dynaflow/later Hydra-Matic article that will likely be the next major article. (As with the first part of the Hydra-Matic article, I have been going through a lot of technical documents and patent literature to get the workings of these things straight, which is complicated by there being so many different transmissions.)

I realize that it is frustrating for regular readers, but I recognize that I get a lot of “long-tail” traffic of people coming to articles months or years after the fact, and I’ve had the unhappy experience before of seeing other people innocently repeat factual errors I’ve made, which is part of why I get caught up in trying to get it right. I know this flies in the face of the “hit post and move on” philosophy of most web content, however, so I appreciate your patience, however strained!

Comment spam

Over the next few weeks, I’m going to be experimenting with some new anti-spam tactics. My existing solution, which had been working pretty well, now has some serious shortcomings following the most recent update to the content management system, so I’m going to need to try something different. (I get hundreds of obvious spam comments every day and having my email inbox flooded with spam comment notifications every few minutes is not fun!)

Since I’m going to have to resort to a certain amount of trial and error, there may be some oddities with commenting or the forms. If you have problems or encounter something strange when leaving a comment or submitting a form, please let me know. I’m very concerned that spam prevention not present an irritation or accessibility problem for my sapient readers.

Going along with this, I decided it would be prudent to clarify some of the language in the comments and contact forms sections of the Privacy Policy. The gist is unchanged (that the website may use information associated with your comment or form submission — some of which is or could potentially be personally identifiable — to confirm that you’re a human user and not some kind of bot or automated script), but I wanted to make clear that the website may conduct those tests in a variety of different ways. (At present, I’m not sure what the final method(s) may end up being.) ETA: For your convenience, the Privacy Policy now has a recent revision log, too.

A Polite Request

I want to ask again that people please not hotlink to images hosted on Ate Up With Motor. (To be clear, by “hotlinking,” I mean placing an image on an external website whose href attribute still refers back to the image location on the Ate Up With Motor site.) Ate Up With Motor runs on a shared server with finite resources; hotlinking images adds to the load on the server and makes it that much more difficult for me to keep the site running at a reasonable speed. For that reason, if I see evidence of hotlinking in the server or error logs, I may take technical steps to block it. (I’ve added a specific stipulation to the Privacy Policy to that effect.) Thanks for understanding!

ETA: I want to draw a clear distinction here between hotlinking images and simply reusing them in some other manner, stipulations for which are discussed in the Reprint/Reuse Policy. If, for example, an image is in the public domain in your jurisdiction, you’re certainly welcome to copy the image and reuse it elsewhere on the web — just don’t expect me to host it for you (which is what hotlinking entails) without asking me first!

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Except as otherwise noted, all text and images are copyright © Aaron Severson dba Ate Up With Motor. (Terms of Use – Reprint/Reuse Policy) Trademarks referenced herein are the property of their respective owners and are used here for informational/nominative purposes.